Famine, Affluence, and Morality

Famine Affluence and Morality In the young philosopher Peter Singer published Famine Affluence and Morality which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics Through this article Singer presen

  • Title: Famine, Affluence, and Morality
  • Author: Peter Singer
  • ISBN: 9780190219208
  • Page: 276
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1972, the young philosopher Peter Singer published Famine, Affluence and Morality, which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics Through this article, Singer presents his view that we have the same moral obligations to those far away as we do to those close to us He argued that choosing not to send life saving money to starving peoplIn 1972, the young philosopher Peter Singer published Famine, Affluence and Morality, which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics Through this article, Singer presents his view that we have the same moral obligations to those far away as we do to those close to us He argued that choosing not to send life saving money to starving people on the other side of the earth is the moral equivalent of neglecting to save drowning children because we prefer not to muddy our shoes If we can help, we must and any excuse is hypocrisy Singer s extreme stand on our moral obligations to others became a powerful call to arms and continues to challenge people s attitudes towards extreme poverty Today, it remains a central touchstone for those who argue we should all help others than we do.As Bill and Melinda Gates observe in their foreword, in the age of today s global philanthropy, Singer s essay is as relevant now as it ever was This attractively packaged, concise edition collects the original article, two of Singer s recent popular writings on our obligations to others around the world, and a new introduction by Singer that discusses his current thinking.

    Famine, Affluence, and Morality Famine, Affluence, and Morality, by Peter Singer Utilitarian Famine, Affluence, and Morality , by Peter Singer As I write this, in November , people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical care. Famine, Affluence, and Morality Summary Study Guide This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion on Famine, Affluence, and Morality by Peter Singer The following version of this essay was used to create this study guide Singer, Peter Famine, Affluence, and Morality Philosophy Public Affairs, Vol , No Spring What Can We Learn from Peter Singer s Famine, Affluence Famine, Affluence, and Morality is an essay published in in the academic journal Philosophy and Public Affairs It was written the year before by Peter Singer Who is Peter Singer, you may ask Peter Singer is a moral philosopher from Australia, and he works as the professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, among other things Peter Singer s Argument in Famine, Affluence and Morality Famine, Affluence and Morality by Peter Singer Words Pages In his own essay Famine, Affluence and Morality , Peter Singer puts forth some compelling arguments for affluent people to give what they have in excess, to the suffering people of the world. Famine, Affluence, and Morality Author s Peter Singer Famine, Affluence, and Morality that I take, so that anyone who accepts certain assumptions, to be made explicit, will, I hope, accept my conclusion I begin Famine, Affluence, and Morality Peter Singer Oxford In , the young philosopher Peter Singer published Famine, Affluence and Morality, which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics Through this article, Singer presents his view that we have the same moral obligations to those far away as we do to those close to us.

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    One thought on “Famine, Affluence, and Morality”

    1. Includes Singer's classic 1972 essay "Famine, Affluence, and Morality" as well as two related 2006 articles in The New York Times Sunday Magazine: "The Singer Solution to World Poverty" and "What Should a Billionaire Give—And What Should You?", both aimed at a more general (nonacademic) U.S. audience with the rather explicit intention of increasing donations to charitable organizations involved in foreign aid.

    2. Peter Singer lesen während man im Flugzeug in den Urlaub sitzt ist vielleicht ein bisschen hart. Aber manchmal muss ich das zum Aufrütteln meiner Selbst tun. Es ist schwer sich selbst einzugestehen, dass man nicht so handelt, wie man es als moralisch richtig empfindet und mit diesem Eingeständnis ist natürlich auch nur der erste kleine Schritt getan. Aber der ist wichtig, damit ich mein Leben altruistischer gestalten kann. Ein kurzes Buch, das nur aus drei seiner Essays besteht, die philosop [...]

    3. I liked this book more than I expected to! Admittedly, the introductions are nearly as long as the original essay and updated article, but the whole thing is worth a read. The author argues that, from a purely moral standpoint, it is wrong NOT to reduce ourselves to near the poverty line and give all our excess in order to reduce the suffering of others, no matter how far away they are. The original, from 1972, was prompted by a refugee crisis in India, but the message is still timely, as such p [...]

    4. This is a reprint of an essay, "Famine, Affluence, and Morality," that Peter Singer wrote 40 years ago. As Bill and Melinda Gates write in the new Forward, maybe "it's time has now come." I remember reading it as a student some twenty years ago and I'm even more persuaded by it today than then. Singer's claim is as simple as it is profound: "If it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening, without thereby sacrificing anything else morally significant, we ought, morally, to do it." [...]

    5. This book actually includes three essays, but I most enjoyed and was most challenged by Famine, Affluence, and Morality itself. Singer's arguments over the course of all three essays hold dramatic implications for the way most of us live our lives, especially in terms of how we spend our money. I personally hesitate to praise major philanthropists (especially those who have made their fortunes through large corporations) because I'm not sure how feasible it is to amass such great amounts of weal [...]

    6. A very important book. This is the second book I have read by Peter Singer, I was mainly introduced to him via his debates on Religion (specifically the one with Oxford Prof. John C. Lennox). I have written about P. Singer in the past. He has helped put a lot of things for me into perspective and I am extremely grateful for that. As a philosophy student, he has helped me realize, that as I am studying Ethics and proper living, I should be readily prepared to sacrifice material comforts that actu [...]

    7. The classic article written by Singer, with a few other more recent articles. The basic argument of the paper is that if you were to see a child drowning you would help them, and there is no reason why a child slightly farther away that you wouldn't also help. The argument is extended to the idea that if a person can help someone on the other side of the world by donating money, they have a moral obligation to do so.

    8. A collection of Singer’s articles plus a new 2016 foreword by Bill and Melinda Gates. Worth reading—makes you think about the moral obligation you have to give money away to help those in need. We can do more and should. Period.I’d like to hear more about how he thinks we can get there. Is stating the moral obligation sufficient? His articles and similar ones reportedly have increased donations. But we are so far from giving enough.

    9. This 1972 essay contains a sentence that may shatter some moral conceptions: ‘If it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening, without thereby sacrificing something of comparable moral importance, we ought, morally, to do it.’The clear language of this essay easily distracts from the radicalness of the ideas. Singer turns the moral intuition of many on its head. He makes a strong utilitarian argument for giving, by making us weigh up what those in affluent countries spend their [...]

    10. Famine, Affluence, and Morality centers on Peter Singer's 1972 essay of the same name, a classic in the area of applied ethics. This is one of those rare works by a philosopher that offers plenty of complexity with which to wrestle while also being accessible to a large portion of the general public. Revisiting this essay renewed my interest in applied ethics and may well kindle or rekindle the same in you.The original essay was a response to a very specific situation but, as mentioned in the ot [...]

    11. A compelling argument for affluent and relatively affluent people to spend more on providing life-saving aid to people in drastically impoverished regions of the world. Compelling but I don't think airtight, which in some ways is irrelevant to Singer's greater point, but does come into play when those will the ability to help must determine how to quantify "reasonable" and "rational." The weakness in Singer's argument (which I won't rehearse here) is that the difference between the toddler in fr [...]

    12. 'If it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening without thereby sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, we ought, morally, to do it.' And of course we should. Singer asks the question of what a human life is worth and discusses the moral code that most who earn an income can save a child's life by donating to charity, instead of spending frivolously on luxuries that one never needs but instead wants. Singer poses a situation of if a child nearby falls into a pond and [...]

    13. Despite being involved in Effective Altruism (or perhaps for this very reason), I didn't get all that much from this. His writing didn't strike me as philosophically rigorous or informative, and he uses arguments based on moral obligation that I don't find compelling. (In particular, my position is that words like "duty" and "supererogatory" don't apply to anything real.) In the end, I'm not even sure whether the book contained anything that will help me spread EA ideas to others.It was still wo [...]

    14. I believe in giving whether morally or not. WE who are blessed need to bless others. However, dont believe guilt is the way to incite others to give. We have raised a generation of greedy entitled folks. The thing that motivates me is the Bible and the amount is arrived by what I can cheerfully give. Love must be the motivator. This book was written in 1972 but still relevant today. Also believe we need to take care of our own ion this country before bringing in refugees. Just my view and guidel [...]

    15. A short read that is a much more convincing argument for donation and is, so far, the only paper I've read in my philosophy studies that has made an impact on how I act. Singer's case that giving is a moral obligation is perhaps the strongest argument in philosophy for any given position, and something that I believe more people need to read.

    16. This is a very important essay. Philosophy is immensely important. Without these ideas--often ridiculed and dismissed--the world would never change. Honestly, everyone should read philosophy every once in a while to nourish their brain and supply them with points of view different from their own, activating their critical mind (a thing that's quickly disappearing).

    17. A short read with one takeaway give, give to better the world. In compliance with FTC guidelines, I must disclose in my review that I received the book for free through Giveaways

    18. Extremely thought provoking. Contains three essays by Singer about charitable giving to reduce global poverty. This short read definitely leaves me rethinking my notion of the "sufficient" level of giving, as well as what should be required to truly be altruistic.

    19. I didn't get to finish this book because I had to return it to the library. What I read so far was intriguing though and an interesting perspective. It definitely made me think.

    20. Good, but I felt it was very focused at billionaires. I need to be responsible, not just Bill Gates. Overall, very thought provoking.

    21. Excellent little volume remixing Singer's classic essay with related, more recent content and commentary. Very quick and easy to read, and yet challenging to digest. Highly recommended.

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